Categories
Recipes

Soups

Carrot soup

Soups

Quick step-by-step instructions for making soup.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Total Time 40 mins
Course Main Course
Servings 4 servings

Equipment

  • saucepan
  • handblender

Instructions
 

  • Chop your vegetables and place in a saucepan with a knob of butter (or oil) and cook with a lid on very gently for about 5 minutes or so until they are soft but not browned.
  • Add boiling water to cover the vegetables, toss in some herbs, salt and pepper, maybe a stock cube or some spices, then simmer for about 30 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and allow to cool for a bit then blend it (you don’t want hot liquid splashing out of the pan while you whizz it smooth!) 

Notes

Easy recipes are carrot soup, leek and potato soup, mixed vegetable soup – it’s a great way to get plenty of vegetables into your diet even for kids who won’t eat them, especially when served with crusty bread or a slice of toast.
If you’re feeling adventurous, try a garlic bean soup, absolutely delicious especially with beans from the garden! Beans are really good for you too, they are low GI and will keep you feeling nice and full for longer.
Categories
Recipes

Incredible Pumpkin Curry

Incredible Pumpkin Curry

Phil Barrett, Edible Garforth Volunteer
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Total Time 45 mins
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 1 White Onion  chopped
  • 600 g Pumpkin  cubed / chunked
  • 400 ml Vegetable Stock
  • 4 Garlic Cloves  crushed
  • 5 cm  Fresh Ginger  grated
  • 1 tbsp  Garam Masala
  • 4 tsp Medium curry powder
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric
  • 1 tsp  Cayenne Pepper  or Substitute For Fresh Chillies to Personal Taste
  • 2 cans Chickpeas  drained and rinsed
  • 200 ml Coconut Milk
  • 1 handful Coriander  roughly chopped

Instructions
 

  • Add the onion, cubed pumpkin and some of the stock to a large saucepan.
  • Cover and Cook on a med/low heat for 10mins until the onion is soft.
  • Turn up the heat to medium/high and add the garlic, ginger and spices to the pan, cooking off for a minute or so, stirring frequently.
  • Add chickpeas, coconut milk, the remaining vegetable stock, pumpkin puree and tomato puree and stir well. 
  • Reduce heat and simmer for 15mins, or until the chunks of pumpkin are soft and the sauce is thickened nicely.
  • Season to taste and add your chopped coriander

Notes

This recipe would also work great with lentils if you preferred. Likewise, if you have some veggies that need eating, chuck some in.
Categories
Recipes

Wild Garlic Pesto

Wild Garlic Pesto

Ingredients
  

  • 100 g wild garlic leaves
  • 50 g parmesan cheese or nutritional yeast for a vegan and veggie-friendly version
  • 50 g toasted pine nuts
  • 1-2 tbsp olive oil
  • lemon juice
  • salt and pepper

Instructions
 

  • Wash wild garlic leaves thoroughly.
  • Place the leaves, parmesan, olive oil and pine nuts into a food processor and blitz. You could do this with a pestle and mortar if you want to be more traditional.
  • Add more oil if you want to have a thinner pesto.
  • Add salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste.
Categories
Recipes

Yummy Pumpkin Gnocchi

Yummy Pumpkin Gnocchi

Phil Barrett, Edible Garforth Volunteer
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Total Time 1 hr
Course Main Course
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 400 g Leftover Pumpkin
  • 120 g Ricotta drained
  • 50 g Parmesan  finely grated, plus extra to serve
  • 1 Egg  lightly beaten
  • 200 g Plain Flour  plus extra to dust
  • 60 g Salted Butter
  • 1 tsp Oil
  • 20 sage leaves  The Doctor's patch has some purple sage you can use!
Categories
Recipes

Creamy Pumpkin Soup

Creamy Pumpkin Soup

Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 25 mins
Total Time 40 mins
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion  coarsely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic  grated
  • 1.5 kg pumpkin  peeled and chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger  grated
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp mixed spice
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 750 ml boiled water  (or omit salt and put in a vegetable stock cube here)
  • 400 ml coconut milk (1 tin)

Instructions
 

  • Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heart before adding the onion and garlic.
  • Cook until the onion becomes transparent.
  • Add the ginger, spices and salt and add the pumpkin.
  • Toss the pumpkin in the oil and cook for 5 minutes.
  • Add the water (or stock) and coconut milk and bring to a boil before reducing the heat to lower.Cook for 20 minutes or until the pumpkin is tender.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.
  • Blend soup until smooth. Serve with a touch of cracked black pepper.
Categories
Growing Guides

Plant Families & Crop Rotation

Plant Families and Crop Rotation

The Linnaean classification system of organisms was developed in 1758 by a Swedish botanist named Carl Linnaeus. The two-part naming system is the method for used for naming and identifying species – the genus name is the first name, and the species name is the second name. All plants are classified into a genus, which is part of a wider plant family, such as Asteraceae or Iridaceae.

Plants (genera/genus) in the same family share physical characteristics that can help us identify them. For example, plants in the Asteraceae (daisy) family usually form the shape of a daisy, while those in the Fabaceae (pea and bean) family hold their seeds in a pod such as a pea or bean. Learning to identify plant families will help you notice similarities between plants, understand their growth habits and growing requirements, and even identify seedlings.

As disease can run in plant families it helps to be able to identify which plant belongs to which so that if disease is encountered you can make a note to rotate what is grown in that space.

This allows any disease to die out for a few years before trying again, prevents failed crops and also maximises crop yield. For example, if you suspect white rot in onions you should not grow any leeks or garlic in the same place for a few years because they all belong to the same Amaryllidaceae family and would be similarly prone to the same disease. You could then choose to plant broccoli, which is from a completely different family, Brassicaceae, instead.

It is common and good practice in growing edible crops to rotate crop families each year within your growing space to avoid any build-up of disease or pests. It also helps to maintain good soil fertility as different crops can give back different nutrients to the soil through their roots or by letting plants break down into the soil for the following year.

The image below shows a good example of crop rotation groups that follow each other well:

Plant Families and Crop Rotation

The Linnaean classification system of organisms was developed in 1758 by a Swedish botanist named Carl Linnaeus. The two-part naming system is the method for used for naming and identifying species – the genus name is the first name, and the species name is the second name. All plants are classified into a genus, which is part of a wider plant family, such as Asteraceae or Iridaceae.

Plants (genera/genus) in the same family share physical characteristics that can help us identify them. For example, plants in the Asteraceae (daisy) family usually form the shape of a daisy, while those in the Fabaceae (pea and bean) family hold their seeds in a pod such as a pea or bean. Learning to identify plant families will help you notice similarities between plants, understand their growth habits and growing requirements, and even identify seedlings.

As disease can run in plant families it helps to be able to identify which plant belongs to which so that if disease is encountered you can make a note to rotate what is grown in that space.

This allows any disease to die out for a few years before trying again, prevents failed crops and also maximises crop yield. For example, if you suspect white rot in onions you should not grow any leeks or garlic in the same place for a few years because they all belong to the same Amaryllidaceae family and would be similarly prone to the same disease. You could then choose to plant broccoli, which is from a completely different family, Brassicaceae, instead.

It is common and good practice in growing edible crops to rotate crop families each year within your growing space to avoid any build-up of disease or pests. It also helps to maintain good soil fertility as different crops can give back different nutrients to the soil through their roots or by letting plants break down into the soil for the following year.

The image below shows a good example of crop rotation groups that follow each other well:

PDF Printable Download

Categories
Growing Guides

Square Foot Gardening

This is an approach to growing food that incorporates companion
planting, intensive spacing, and getting the most food possible out of a small space.

It all started in 1981 as a concept developed and coined by civil engineer Mel Bartholomew. Careful planning can have a huge impact on how much food you grow, and how much waste you can avoid.

How many plants?

1 per square: Celery, Corn, Aubergine, Kale, Lettuce (head), Okra,
Oregano, Parsley, Peppers, Potatoes, Rosemary, Sweet potatoes,
Tomatoes (staked)

2 per square: Cantaloupe, Cucumbers, Pumpkins, Watermelons, Winter squash

(Up to) 4 per square: basil, garlic (for growing larger bulbs), kohl rabi, leeks (for growing larger plants), lettuce (leaf), onions (for growing larger bulbs), winter radishes, swede, summer squash (with climbing frame), Swiss chard, tomatoes (with frame), zucchini (with frame)

(Up to) 8 or 9 per square: green beans (bush or pole), beetroot, coriander, leeks (smaller but more plants), peas, spinach, turnips

(Up to) 16-per-square plantings: carrots, parsnips, radishes

(Up to) 2-Per-4 plantings: broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower

Things to bear in mind:
* Crop Rotation
* Plant height and spread
* Diversity – the more variety of plants the more benefits for us, the plants and the soil!
* Successional sowing: think about time to crop and what’s going in next. Does it work well with the plants next to it?

Downloadable PDF guide with template

Categories
Seed Sowing

Rocket

Eruca vesicaria

When to Sow: All year (weather permitting)

How to Sow:

  • Sow thinly into finely raked, warm moist soil, or in pots in bands approx.
  • 9cm (3.5” wide, covering the seed lightly and firming the soil gently. Grow on keeping the soil moist.
  • Harvest when the leaves are 7.5-10cm (3-4”) tall.
  • Sow little and often for continuous supply. Fleece can be used in the winter months for added protection if grown outdoors. Can also be grown under glass in pots or trays with or without heat, or on the windowsill all year round.
  • By continually harvesting the outer leaves, rocket can be used as a cut and come again crop giving you great value from a single sowing.
Categories
Seed Sowing

Cabbage

Brassica oleracea

When to Sow: Jan-Feb indoors, March-June outdoors

How to Sow:

  • Sow Jan-Feb in a propagator on a windowsill or in a frost free greenhouse.
  • Cover with 6mm of compos.
  • Transplant seedlings into 75mm (3”) pots, grow on and finally plant outside in well cultivated soil for early crops.
  • For later sowings, sow thinly March-June into a finely raked seedbed at a depth of 13mm.
Categories
Seed Sowing

Celery

Apium graveolens

How to Sow:

  • Sow seed in a heated propagator on the surface of a good free draining damp seed compost.
  • Cover with a sprinkling of compost. Germination takes up to 15 days.
  • Transplant when large enough to handle into trays or individual modules.
  • Grow on steadily in cooler conditions before planting out after all risk of frost has passed, 30 cm (12”) between plants each way.
  • It is essential plants are kept adequately moist throughout the growing season. If grown in a block, plants are naturally self blanching.